AARDSCHOK February 2002 - News Section  

AARDSCHOK july 2001 Acoustically Driven
Review by Michel van de Moosdijk
 Translation by Monique Spruit 

 

Uriah Heep – Acoustically Driven

Classic Rock Legends/Bertus

After having released the live album “Future Echoes of The Past” a few months ago, the veterans of Uriah Heep come out with another live album which is completely semi-acoustic. Jethro Tull’s Ian Anderson has been asked to join for some songs and colours songs up with his flute. Aside from the choral backgrounds Heep’s sound is so well-known for, another three female background singers have been hired and even some violins and cellos can be heard. Neither trouble nor expense have been spared to make something special out of this product. What really appeals to me is the fact that Heep haven’t chosen the to be expected classics. Of course there are many old songs from the David Byron and Ken Hensley era to be heard (“Lady In Black”, “Blind Eye”, “Wonderworld”, “Echoes in the Dark”, “The Easy Road”, “Circus”, “Come Back To Me” and the “Medley” built up by “The Wizard”, “Paradise” and “Circle of Hands”) but those are not by definition the most famous songs by the band. In short, it will not surprise anyone when I state that “Acoustically Driven” has turned out to be a pretty masterpiece. It is clear that most songs are perfect for acoustic versions. Another bonus is that singer Bernie Shaw had got into his stride once again. Just like on “Future Echoes of the Past” he shows that he masters the old songs in apple-pie order. Let Heep look after themselves alright!

Michel van de Moosdijk

 

 

 

 

 

 

AARDSCHOK june 2001 Review by Edwin van Hoof  Translation by Monique Spruit

Review AARDSCHOK magazine (Holland) URIAH HEEP - SURVIVOR April 29 E-WERK Cologne (by Edwin van Hoof) 

It seems that every renowned rock band from the past resort to Germany. Having seen Styx, Kansas and Asia with our eastern neighbours over the past few months, now it was time to head to Cologne to see Uriah Heep and Survivor in concert. When Survivor hit the stage it rapidly becomes clear that it is going to be a tough night for our eardrums. The sound is extremely loud and completely out of balance as a result of which we are devoid of Jimi Jamison's vocals. When this fault gets fixed, we are faced with an instrumental part that takes up some ten minutes. 

Of course, Frankie Sullivan controls his instrument like no-one else, but as a support-act it would be more sensible to fill up your time differently. Especially when you have a repertoire like Survivor with only top albums. When Jamison returns on stage all inhibitions are finally lost and we can simply enjoy. "Burning Bridges", "High on You", "The Search Is Over" and so on. 

Survivor play what the crowd wants to hear and do so brilliantly. The sound remains extremely loud though and leaves a negative mark on an evening that could have started so well. 

Uriah Heep have toured the European stages faithfully for over thirty years and once again it shows why this band is still so immensely popular. When “Return to Fantasy” turns out to be the start of a set full of classics, the roof comes down instantly. As usual Mick has a smile as wide as the stage on his face during the whole show. His guitar playing is a pleasure to listen to and the game he plays with the audience is remarkable. For decades the audiences eat out of his hand and enjoy Box’ mimic arts. Bernie Shaw should not be forgotten. The band is lucky with such a great performer with a likewise throat. Shaw rampages across the stage without getting tired. Tonight we get a well-filled set of almost two hours in which Heep stack highlight after highlight. Too many highlights to mention, but between the classics from the old times, the fabulous “Heartless Land” from “Sonic Origami” should especially be mentioned here. Shaw shows his true greatness with this song and Heep altogether show a side that few thought was possible. “Sonic ..” seems to have been the start for a second youth for Heep. The contrast between this album and the bombastic and theatrical material from the past may be big, the melodic rock fans couldn’t care less.

 (translation Monique Spruit)

 

AARDSCHOK magazine  May  2001  

The English rock band Uriah Heep comes to Holland in the beginning of may. Guitarist and co founder Mick Box confirmed his band will do a CD signing session of new material in CD shop the Waterput in Bergen op Zoom.
 Around 17.30 they will also do a short acoustic set. Later that evening the band will go on stage of the Tilburg 013. The day after the band will gig the Kade in Zaandam. Later this year the new Uriah Heep album Acoustically Driven will be released. A acoustic set featuring Ian Anderson ( Jethro Tull)oo many highlights to mention, but between the classics from the old times, the fabulous "Heartless Land" from "Sonic Origami" should especially be mentioned here. Shaw shows his true greatness with this song and Heep altogether show a side that few thought was possible. "Sonic .." seems to have been the start for a second youth for Heep. The contrast between this album and the bombastic and theatrical material from the past may be big, the melodic rock fans couldn't care less. (translation Monique Spruit)

 

  • The Uriah Heep advert on the news page.
Aardschok   May   2001  Future Echoes review

Uriah Heep

Future Echoes Of The Past

Maybe most people missed it, but the gentleman of Uriah Heep are in  business for more then 30 years.The credits should go to Mick Box for his strong character to go on like this. He and Lee Kerslake kept the band on the road all those years. I believe Lee Kerslake left a while with Ozzy Osbourne, but he deserves it to be mentioned.

I followed Heep over the years and am probably one of the few who appreciated the Peter Goalby period much.( At the times of Abominog and Head First).

The band now releases a beautiful  live double album. What ( again ) is clear is the fact that Heep is a well oiled machine. The performance on this album stands as a house. Of course the exellent performed choirs are an important ingredient. But what I like even more is  that singer Bernie Shaw now in detail knows how  to sing the old classics. Of course he perfectly sings the stuff from recent albums as Sea of Light and Sonic Origami, but also classics like 'Look at yourself', 'Stealin', 'Gypsy', 'Sweet Freedom', 'July Morning' and 'Easy Livin'. This double CD also contains a few very beautiful acoustic excepts, and the to me unknown 'Come away Melinda' is a strong song for a bonus track. Around this time ex-Heepsters Ken  Hensley and John Lawton are touring Europe with their band, armed with a bunch of Heep Classic's. But the real Uriah Heep is here on May 8 and 9. For the real fan it's a double party. It's a shame that the band doesn't bring support band Survivor with them...

Michel van de Moosdijk